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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
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    Montgomery, Al.
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    1,817

    Installing FSU's Fast Break Offense

    Since everyone has contributed to the offensive strat forum, I figured I would put my 2 cents worth into also.

    Being a FSU fan, and having numerous tapes of the Seminoles over the past decade and a half, and reading about FSU’s high octane offense, this is my take on the scheme.

    The FSU offense was developed by Bobby Bowden, Mark Richt (Current Georgia Head Coach), and Chuck Amato (Current NC State Head Coach).

    FSU was one of the first Division I-A schools to go to a pro-style attack in the late 80’s and 90’s and away from the traditional power run offense’s.

    The "Fast Break," as it was known was born and called the “Fast Break” like the basketball term, was the offense’s ability to get the ball downfield quickly,

    The “Fast Break” employed a no-huddle shotgun offense that let Charlie Ward, either uses his receivers or streak from the pocket if he saw a hole.

    "There's nothing more frustrating for a defense than covering everything perfectly," Bowden said,

    The concept of the Fast Break is nothing new to college football, actually takes its concepts from several different forms for the spread attack offense.

    The passing attack relies on spreading the defense horizontally and vertically and was strictly a No Huddle Offensive Scheme. The base formations for the Fast Break are the I-Formations and Shotgun Formations.

    To spread the defense horizontally, the system uses flares and swing passes to the backs in the flats. Bowden starting recruiting what was called “scat backs”, running backs in the 5’10” 185lb range. Quick and elusive as he wanted them to be.

    Bowden empathized that “scat backs”, when presented in the shotgun formations, were “hard to find” behind the large offensive lineman, and when found, the scat backs would be past the line of scrimmage, and could make positive yardage on most plays.

    Thus, the likes of Rock Preston, Travis Minor, and Warrick Dunn come mind. Today, we have Lorenzo Booker and Leon Washington to lead the way in the term of scat backs.

    The flare or swing pass was able to get the ball into the backs hands in the flats at a sprint, where as a screen pass the line would pull and the scat would have to slow down to receive the ball. That is the difference in the swing/flare pass compared to the screen pass.

    Once open in the flat, the scat had only the LB to beat. LB’s had to cover the field horizontally if quickly if possible. Leaving the middle of the field open. Once the flare/swing pass was established, the LB’ had to compensate by spreading further out the sidelines leaving the middle of the field open.

    Now, we go into the “HB Direct” and “slants” over the middle cause that area of the field has been left open by the LB’s being spread horizontally by the flare or swing pass.

    In order to stop the HB Direct and the quick slants over the middle, usually the FS/SS would cheat up to fill the void left by the LB’s.

    Now we come to the part where we stretch the defense vertically because we now have one-on-one matchups with our speedy WR’s with no over the top help.

    Bowden would teach his QB’s to under throw the ball. Why you ask? Because at the time, the Fast Break didn’t need a super strong arm QB, The system was designed to allow mediocre QB’s excel quickly into the scheme.

    Defensive Backs had a tendency to focus directly on the WR on streak plays, never really looking for the ball, WR’s are taught never to take there eye off the ball, by under throwing, thus allowed the DB to over pursue the ball and allow the WR to comeback and make the play.

    The Fast Break passes schemes are not timed based like Spurrier’s Fun N Gun, where the QB throws to a particular spot on the field and the WR must get to the ball.

    Now, we have established the basic fast break scheme of stretching the defense, both horizontally and vertically.

    Then, some QB name Charlie Ward came to Florida State, being one of the first QB’s to be able to throw and run with the ball with great balance for both, FSU tweaked its pro-style offense around its leader's hard court-tested mobility in 1990.

    In order to use Charlie’s mobility, FSU incorporated more naked boot leg and roll out passes in the system, something not usably found in the Fast Break offense with less mobile QB’s.

    The past few years, since the graduation of Chris Weinke, FSU had gotten further and further away from the Fast Break offense and the offensive production has greatly suffered.

    During the off season, Bowden hired OC and offensive line coach McHale from Marshall to energize the FSU offense and work with OC Jeff Bowden.

    Jeff will remain in the booth while Coach McHale will make the calls on the field. Coach McHale promised the FSU offense be getting back into its old self, as the offense is going to run mostly the I-formation and utilize a lot of shotgun 4 and 5 sets.

    I plan to try into incorporate a Fast Break offense into my plans for the 06 year. I will give the playbook to use, key plays, and incorporate the concept into the game.

    I hope maybe this can be useful to someone.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Youngstown Ohio
    Posts
    531
    I've really noticed two things in this post:

    1. Fast Break is a nice offense
    2. You are somewhat of an FSU fan
    A.k.A poppa_pump14
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    VGDjWll13 0
    UA reemer 14


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    my mypsace ^^^

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    dirrty south
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    12,617
    Quote Originally Posted by TrojanNole
    Since everyone has contributed to the offensive strat forum, I figured I would put my 2 cents worth into also.

    Being a FSU fan, and having numerous tapes of the Seminoles over the past decade and a half, and reading about FSU’s high octane offense, this is my take on the scheme.

    The FSU offense was developed by Bobby Bowden, Mark Richt (Current Georgia Head Coach), and Chuck Amato (Current NC State Head Coach).

    FSU was one of the first Division I-A schools to go to a pro-style attack in the late 80’s and 90’s and away from the traditional power run offense’s.

    The "Fast Break," as it was known was born and called the “Fast Break” like the basketball term, was the offense’s ability to get the ball downfield quickly,

    The “Fast Break” employed a no-huddle shotgun offense that let Charlie Ward, either uses his receivers or streak from the pocket if he saw a hole.

    "There's nothing more frustrating for a defense than covering everything perfectly," Bowden said,

    The concept of the Fast Break is nothing new to college football, actually takes its concepts from several different forms for the spread attack offense.

    The passing attack relies on spreading the defense horizontally and vertically and was strictly a No Huddle Offensive Scheme. The base formations for the Fast Break are the I-Formations and Shotgun Formations.

    To spread the defense horizontally, the system uses flares and swing passes to the backs in the flats. Bowden starting recruiting what was called “scat backs”, running backs in the 5’10” 185lb range. Quick and elusive as he wanted them to be.

    Bowden empathized that “scat backs”, when presented in the shotgun formations, were “hard to find” behind the large offensive lineman, and when found, the scat backs would be past the line of scrimmage, and could make positive yardage on most plays.

    Thus, the likes of Rock Preston, Travis Minor, and Warrick Dunn come mind. Today, we have Lorenzo Booker and Leon Washington to lead the way in the term of scat backs.

    The flare or swing pass was able to get the ball into the backs hands in the flats at a sprint, where as a screen pass the line would pull and the scat would have to slow down to receive the ball. That is the difference in the swing/flare pass compared to the screen pass.

    Once open in the flat, the scat had only the LB to beat. LB’s had to cover the field horizontally if quickly if possible. Leaving the middle of the field open. Once the flare/swing pass was established, the LB’ had to compensate by spreading further out the sidelines leaving the middle of the field open.

    Now, we go into the “HB Direct” and “slants” over the middle cause that area of the field has been left open by the LB’s being spread horizontally by the flare or swing pass.

    In order to stop the HB Direct and the quick slants over the middle, usually the FS/SS would cheat up to fill the void left by the LB’s.

    Now we come to the part where we stretch the defense vertically because we now have one-on-one matchups with our speedy WR’s with no over the top help.

    Bowden would teach his QB’s to under throw the ball. Why you ask? Because at the time, the Fast Break didn’t need a super strong arm QB, The system was designed to allow mediocre QB’s excel quickly into the scheme.

    Defensive Backs had a tendency to focus directly on the WR on streak plays, never really looking for the ball, WR’s are taught never to take there eye off the ball, by under throwing, thus allowed the DB to over pursue the ball and allow the WR to comeback and make the play.

    The Fast Break passes schemes are not timed based like Spurrier’s Fun N Gun, where the QB throws to a particular spot on the field and the WR must get to the ball.

    Now, we have established the basic fast break scheme of stretching the defense, both horizontally and vertically.

    Then, some QB name Charlie Ward came to Florida State, being one of the first QB’s to be able to throw and run with the ball with great balance for both, FSU tweaked its pro-style offense around its leader's hard court-tested mobility in 1990.

    In order to use Charlie’s mobility, FSU incorporated more naked boot leg and roll out passes in the system, something not usably found in the Fast Break offense with less mobile QB’s.

    The past few years, since the graduation of Chris Weinke, FSU had gotten further and further away from the Fast Break offense and the offensive production has greatly suffered.

    During the off season, Bowden hired OC and offensive line coach McHale from Marshall to energize the FSU offense and work with OC Jeff Bowden.

    Jeff will remain in the booth while Coach McHale will make the calls on the field. Coach McHale promised the FSU offense be getting back into its old self, as the offense is going to run mostly the I-formation and utilize a lot of shotgun 4 and 5 sets.

    I plan to try into incorporate a Fast Break offense into my plans for the 06 year. I will give the playbook to use, key plays, and incorporate the concept into the game.

    I hope maybe this can be useful to someone.
    could FSU be moving away from the FBO because.............oh............i don't know..................thier OC that incorporated it to charlie is now the hc at..............georgia?
    In loving memory of my godson Kaleb Elijah Gaitor 09/02/04 - 09/02/04 RIP


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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by djwill13
    could FSU be moving away from the FBO because.............oh............i don't know..................thier OC that incorporated it to charlie is now the hc at..............georgia?
    mmmm...Yep.

    It seems Jeffery never got the idea of playcalling the fast break down properly.

    If only Georgia could have a couple of bad years and fire that Richt guy, we may have a position for him at FSU.

  5. #5
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    Apr 2004
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    dirrty south
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrojanNole


    mmmm...Yep.

    It seems Jeffery never got the idea of playcalling the fast break down properly.

    If only Georgia could have a couple of bad years and fire that Richt guy, we may have a position for him at FSU.
    doubt richt would want to step down honestly. i mean me know bobby isn't going anywhere. he'll be fsu's joe pa, so i doubt richt would take a step down to OC from HC. i think if richt goes anywhere it'll be to the pros.
    In loving memory of my godson Kaleb Elijah Gaitor 09/02/04 - 09/02/04 RIP


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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
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    568
    Quote Originally Posted by TrojanNole
    It seems Jeffery never got the idea of playcalling the fast break down properly.

    He hasn't gotten the playcalling down for ANY kind of offense, let alone the fast break.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    568
    One other thing, the fast break was put in place by Richt and Brad Scott who was the OC at the time (Richt was QB coach).

    Scott left to coach at USC....briefly. Heh. I believe he's running essentially the same offense as OC for Clemson now.

  8. #8
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    Jun 2004
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    Montgomery, Al.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fluff E Bunny
    One other thing, the fast break was put in place by Richt and Brad Scott who was the OC at the time (Richt was QB coach).

    Scott left to coach at USC....briefly. Heh. I believe he's running essentially the same offense as OC for Clemson now.
    Oh ya, I forgot about Brad Scott. He has been on a down hill ever since he left FSU.

    I dont even know if he still the OC or assistent at Clemson. Tommy hired a new OC after Whitehurst's terrible year last year.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Canada
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    3
    Great post TrojanNole. I remember their offence would start out in proform(split backs) and motion into iform and viceversa. Our OC at the time loved that and made us do it 75% of the time. ah the memories.

  10. #10
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    Jun 2004
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    Montgomery, Al.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dawgy
    Great post TrojanNole. I remember their offence would start out in proform(split backs) and motion into iform and viceversa. Our OC at the time loved that and made us do it 75% of the time. ah the memories.
    According to the book I have on the Fast Break.

    ProForm, I-form, then shotgun 2-back sets.

    The only thing is I havent found a playbook with just those formations in it.

  11. #11
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    Apr 2004
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    dirrty south
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrojanNole


    According to the book I have on the Fast Break.

    ProForm, I-form, then shotgun 2-back sets.

    The only thing is I havent found a playbook with just those formations in it.
    i wish there were a playbook that has both the sg 2 back sets in it. i would've figured it would've been in georgia's playbook
    In loving memory of my godson Kaleb Elijah Gaitor 09/02/04 - 09/02/04 RIP


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  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    164
    Quote Originally Posted by djwill13
    i wish there were a playbook that has both the sg 2 back sets in it. i would've figured it would've been in georgia's playbook
    There are three.

    New Mexico State
    WVU
    and my pre game owning favorite:
    Arkansas

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
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    617
    Thanx Hatman, the SG 2 back has always been one of my favorites.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    617

    SG 2 Back

    Can somebody tell me how they've been using the SG 2b? Right now I pretty much stick to running the option out of it, but I was wondering what kind of passing potential it has.

  15. #15
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    1,817
    Quote Originally Posted by chrisbzn832
    Can somebody tell me how they've been using the SG 2b? Right now I pretty much stick to running the option out of it, but I was wondering what kind of passing potential it has.
    FSU's Fast Break run the SG 2B sets and throw the swing or flare passes out of it.

    This year, we have the swing or flare pass in this formation, last year we didnt have that option.


 

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