How to Build an Intimidating Custom Playbook in Madden NFL 25.

The top 100 online Madden NFL leader board is a thing of legend. We all know of a guy who knew a friend of a guy who played a game against a guy who was in the top 100. They are the best of the best, but yet no one ever comes into contact with one. So how are you supposed to recognize them?

By their custom playbook, of course!

What are they actually using in that custom playbook? Most likely they have some variety of Gun Tight Flex—Falcon Cross and of course Strong Close—Off Tackle. The plays and formations you use often tell a lot about the type of Madden player you are.

Let’s be honest here—you know you are going to win a game when you face someone who comes out in Singleback Ace and starts throwing streaks to TEs over the middle of the field. Am I right?

On the flip side, if you face someone who comes out in Gun Ace Tight Slots—Pats Wheel Drag you know that you are going to have a problem all day long. Maybe it’s the wheel routes that are causing you headaches, or maybe it’s that gosh darn FL Screen to the HB that keeps beating you. Whatever it is, you simply know that your opponent knows that you know he’s going to kick that game-winning 64-yard field goal with Sebastian Janikowski down to the exact yard and there’s nothing you can do about it.

The point is that in the long run it’s a lot easier to build a custom playbook in Madden NFL 25 that makes you look like a pro than to actually be one. You probably have a full-time job, or heck maybe you are still in school. At the end of the day the reason isn’t really important, because the fact is we all want to be perceived as that player. The one who always converts on fourth down, the one who always gets the clutch user pick in the fourth quarter, and the one who is always in perfect position to make a play.

That’s why I’m going to build you a custom playbook that will make you look like a pro to the world around you.

Sit back. Relax. And Lockup.

Step 1: Picking the Right Run Formation

Strong Close is the obvious choice here, but remember you want to look like a pro. Everyone uses Strong Close. Pros are not like everyone. They are ahead of the curve and so are you.

That’s why you are going to use I-Form Tight. Saddle up your horses because it’s going to be a bumpy ride. Nothing screams “I dare you to stop my run game” like I-Form Tight.

You want to have a combination of FB Dive, HB Dive, HB Blast, HB Misdirection, and HB Toss at your disposal. All these plays meshed together make the perfect running formation.

You don’t need no stinking Strong Close—Off Tackle. It’s so Madden NFL 2011.

Step 2: Base Passing Formation

Speaking of Madden NFL 2011, we will skip right around Gun Snugs/Gun Tight/Gun Tight Flex and any other compressed formation because no Madden pro is going to lose to a player who runs Falcon Cross, Bench, or Saints Spot Shake all game long. Don’t get me wrong—all those plays are good, but you are much better off using a newer, sexier formation that no one uses.

That’s why the Gun Trey Open is going to be added instead.

When your buddies ask “Why do you use Gun Trey Open,” respond with this:

“Because when my opponents base align to set up the 4-3 defense it will them at a numbers disadvantage. It also means that they can only blitz off the right edge because if they blitz off the left edge it will be extremely easy for me to hit the HB on a quick flat to the left. Not to mention I love taking advantage of the one-on-one isolation of my FL on the left side of the field.”

Step 3: Scoring in the Red Zone

Everyone has all these high-tech plays they use in the red zone. Your next-door neighbor tells you how he pounds the rock and he never gets stopped. Your wannabe buddy tells you that he always uses screens in the red zone, but what the pros do is use one play.

Every. Single. Time.

Goal Line Normal—PA Spot. This is the play you are going to use every time in the red zone. Look to the TE running the slant out and the short spot route inside. Both these routes will beat just about any defense you will face. If for some reason you do get stopped, keep running the play.

When you’re a pro it’s better to use the same play over and over again even if it’s not working because “this guy isn’t even doing anything to stop it.”

Step 4: Random Play Because You “Just Want to See if It Works In-Game”

This is all about the perception of being a pro. All pros have a play that they randomly use and declare it. You must let your opponent know this before the snap of the ball or the play doesn’t qualify.

Go ahead and use any play.

Step 5: Utilize the Best Play in the Game

Ever play a game where you got destroyed? Did your opponent keep scoring even at the end of the game?

Yah, pros don’t do that. Pros call QB Kneel. Even if it’s in the third quarter.

If you have the game in hand you call QB Kneel. No questions asked. Why? Not because you want your opponents to think you are a good sport (they will think that, though)—it’s because it gives you the quickest route to ending the game. You need to get this game over with and get into another one.
This is a win-win situation. Everyone will think you are a nice humble competitor when in reality you are just trying to put a beating on another opponent as quickly as possible.

You officially have the foundation for building a custom playbook in Madden NFL 25 that will scream “I’m legit.” The hardest part of every game will be you trying to get your headset to work so you can declare your random play.

If you need me I’ll be in MaddenTips Online Community—where the real pros play.

Check out ALL 32 NFL Team Playbooks in Madden NFL 25!

Winning should be easy. Never lose to your friends again!

Related posts:

  1. New Playbook Out! Get the new Offensive Custom Playbook
  2. Offensive Custom Playbook
  3. Custom Playbook Bundle
  4. Madden NFL 25 Tips: Choosing a Playbook
  5. The Best Playbook in Madden NFL 25

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